meest:

"Today I was sitting on the stairs and I met a girl there. She stared at me and I said hello and sat down. She said hi back. I asked her what her name was and she told me it was Ava. I pulled out a cigarette and started to light it when she asked if she could have one. I retrieved them out of my pocket and handed her one. Our hands briefly touched. Hers were soft but mine were rough. They only touched for a millisecond but it felt like the world stopped. She lit hers and blew a long course of smoke from her cracked pink lips. She made an O shape with her lips as smoke traced them. She looked at me like she’d known me forever. Like she knew all my secrets. She asked me when I started smoking and I said about 2 years ago when my dad left. I asked her and she said oh I don’t smoke as she exhaled the poison. Then, she somehow managed to smile without even flinching. She was calm but passionate about absolutely nothing. We talked for a little while longer. She had a dark circle surround the bottom of her big blue left eye as if she had been hit by something. When I mentioned it her hand flew to her pale skin and she outlined the injury. She looked surprised that there was mark; like she couldn’t remember what happened. She shrugged it off and said she bumped into something. Her auburn hair framed her petite face with flushed rosy cheeks. She looked upset. I asked what brought her to this spot and she said it’s where she often likes to come and sit and just watch all the people pass by. She tugged on her leather jacket as a gust of wind blew past. She told me she should be getting back to her room. I didn’t want to leave her side. I wanted to pause this moment forever. She started to get up and I asked “why the hurry?” She clenched her jaw and gave a timid look my way. She tried to play it off and said “oh, I just thought it was getting late.” I didn’t mean to scare her. As we went to part our separate ways, I heard a shriek and automatically spun around hoping to see her running back towards me. To my surprise, two girls yelled Ava’s name and sounded relieved that she was okay. I stopped to listen to their conversation for a moment. They yelled at Ava asking why she would do this without saying anything? Then, they said “who does these things?”, as if she had wondered off before. She glanced behind her shoulder and gave an apologetic look my way. The girls took her away and I went back home. I doubt I’ll ever see her again but for a moment there, I thought I found her.”

meest:

"Today I was sitting on the stairs and I met a girl there. She stared at me and I said hello and sat down. She said hi back. I asked her what her name was and she told me it was Ava. I pulled out a cigarette and started to light it when she asked if she could have one. I retrieved them out of my pocket and handed her one. Our hands briefly touched. Hers were soft but mine were rough. They only touched for a millisecond but it felt like the world stopped. She lit hers and blew a long course of smoke from her cracked pink lips. She made an O shape with her lips as smoke traced them. She looked at me like she’d known me forever. Like she knew all my secrets. She asked me when I started smoking and I said about 2 years ago when my dad left. I asked her and she said oh I don’t smoke as she exhaled the poison. Then, she somehow managed to smile without even flinching. She was calm but passionate about absolutely nothing. We talked for a little while longer. She had a dark circle surround the bottom of her big blue left eye as if she had been hit by something. When I mentioned it her hand flew to her pale skin and she outlined the injury. She looked surprised that there was mark; like she couldn’t remember what happened. She shrugged it off and said she bumped into something. Her auburn hair framed her petite face with flushed rosy cheeks. She looked upset. I asked what brought her to this spot and she said it’s where she often likes to come and sit and just watch all the people pass by. She tugged on her leather jacket as a gust of wind blew past. She told me she should be getting back to her room. I didn’t want to leave her side. I wanted to pause this moment forever. She started to get up and I asked “why the hurry?” She clenched her jaw and gave a timid look my way. She tried to play it off and said “oh, I just thought it was getting late.” I didn’t mean to scare her. As we went to part our separate ways, I heard a shriek and automatically spun around hoping to see her running back towards me. To my surprise, two girls yelled Ava’s name and sounded relieved that she was okay. I stopped to listen to their conversation for a moment. They yelled at Ava asking why she would do this without saying anything? Then, they said “who does these things?”, as if she had wondered off before. She glanced behind her shoulder and gave an apologetic look my way. The girls took her away and I went back home. I doubt I’ll ever see her again but for a moment there, I thought I found her.”

humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"

humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"